Category Archives: Macbeth

PLE – 10xEN1 – Home learning due Thursday 24 July

Why does Macbeth avoid using specific language, opting instead for euphemisms, when speaking of murder in Act 1, scene 7 and Act 3, scene 4?

Answers in the comments box below, please.

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PLE – 10xEN1 – Home learning due Friday 18 July

I really enjoyed Tuesday’s rehearsal lesson and your final performances this morning. Aren’t you amazed at how well you and your peers coped with learning large blocs of Shakespearean text?

Your honest reflection will be appreciated and interesting to read so that’s your home learning for today. You should consider what you did well in preparation for the performance, in the performance itself and how you could have made it even better. Feedback in the comments box below, please.

A final point: those groups/individual students who want to perform their scene in the end-of-term assembly need to let me know that you’re doing it before the end of the week. (Ruby, have you persuaded Tara yet?) Once you have committed to doing it, there is no backing out!

PLE – 10y1 – Home learning due Monday 21 July

Using your understanding of the extract, explain how the following lines might be performed.

Consider: actions, positioning, movement, voice, gesture, facial expression

ACT III SCENE III A park near the palace.
[Enter Three Murderers]
First Murderer But who did bid thee join with us?
Third Murderer Macbeth.
Second Murderer He needs not our mistrust, since he delivers
Our offices and what we have to do
To the direction just.
First Murderer Then stand with us.
The west yet glimmers with some streaks of day:
Now spurs the lated traveller apace
To gain the timely inn; and near approaches
The subject of our watch.
Third Murderer Hark! I hear horses.

I’ve put a link to the No Fear Shakespeare version here so you can use this to help you. Remember that you will need to quote from the original text. http://nfs.sparknotes.com/macbeth/page_102.html

An independent enquirer working at:
Grade E will show a basic understanding of performance techniques and make limited reference to the text.
Grade D will show occasional understanding of effectiveness of performance techniques and make some references to the text.
Grade C will show a sound understanding of the effectiveness of performance techniques and give clear references to the text to support response.

PLE – 10y1 – Home learning due Monday 21 July

On Monday 21 July we will enjoy dramatic performances of key scenes from Macbeth performed by you!

Choose which scene you want to do from the list below, choose your fellow Shakespearean actors and start practising. You will not have access to the script on the day so you have a week to learn your lines, making sure you understand them, and practise how your chosen scene should be performed (think about starting positions, movement, proxemics, actions, use of voice and so on). You may, of course, bring in costumes and props to enhance your (group’s) performance.

  • (Act 1, scene 3: lines 1 – 86) Macbeth and Banquo meet the witches on the heath; Macbeth is told he will be king.  Five actors required.
  • (Act 1, scene 5: lines 1 – 28) Lady Macbeth reads Macbeth’s letter in which he tells her of the witches and their prophecy. One actor required.
  • (Act 1, scene 7: lines 1 – 29) Macbeth agonises over whether to kill Duncan or not. One actor required.
  • (Act 2, scene 1: lines 33 – 64) Is this a dagger which I see before me… One actor required.
  • (Act 2, scene 2: lines 1 – end) King Duncan is murdered in his sleep. Two actors required.
  • (Act 3, scene 4: lines 32 – 88) Banquo’s ghost appears at Macbeth’s banquet. Four actors required.
  • (Act 4, scene 1: lines 46 – 134) The witches show Macbeth apparitions that convince him that he cannot be harmed. Four (or seven) actors required.
  • (Act 5, scene 1: lines 1 – end) Out, damned spot! Lady Macbeth walks and talks in her sleep, driven mad by her guilt. Three actors required.
  • (Act 5, scene 5: lines 7 – 27) Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow… His wife’s death sets Macbeth brooding on life’s futility. Two actors required (though one is a very minor role).

We will use Wednesday’s lesson on 13 July for rehearsing the scenes so bring your script (or don’t, if you don’t need it by then!), any props you need and a huge enthusiasm to take part and have fun!

Resources for The Globe theatre in London (for Year 10 display)

http://www.english.cam.ac.uk/converse/movies/sound_globe.swf

http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips/shakespeare…globe-theatre/3342.html

http://www.shakespearesglobe.com/education/discovery-space

http://www.shakespearesglobe.com/uploads/files/2014/01/the_globe.pdf

Labelled slides of The Globe

Shakespeare_PP

You might consider the following when planning your display:

  • Diagram(s) of The Globe, perhaps with the different parts of the theatre labelled, e.g. the yard, gallery, etc.
  • 3D model of The Globe
  • What was it like watching a play at the theatre in Shakespeare’s time?
  • How popular was the theatre and Shakespeare’s plays in his own time?
  • Were there any disadvantages or difficulties in producing and performing a play in such a theatre? (For example, there was no lighting – at least, light sufficient to illuminate the whole stage – so plays had to be performed during the afternoon. What were the drawbacks of this?)
  • Is there anything else that’s important which I have left out?

PLE – 10xEN1 – Home learning during Activities/Work Experience Week

On Thursday 17 July we will enjoy dramatic performances of key scenes from Macbeth performed by you! I have booked out the hall for this, we will have the use of the stage and, in short, it’s going to be done right!

Choose which scene you want to do from the list below, choose your fellow Shakespearean actors and start practising. You will not have access to the script on the day so you have a fortnight (just about) to learn your lines, making sure you understand them, and practise how your chosen scene should be performed (think about starting positions, movement, proxemics, actions, use of voice and so on). You may, of course, bring in costumes and props to enhance your (group’s) performance.

  • (Act 1, scene 3: lines 1 – 86) Macbeth and Banquo meet the witches on the heath; Macbeth is told he will be king.  Five actors required.
  • (Act 1, scene 5: lines 1 – 28) Lady Macbeth reads Macbeth’s letter in which he tells her of the witches and their prophecy. One actor required.
  • (Act 1, scene 7: lines 1 – 29) Macbeth agonises over whether to kill Duncan or not. One actor required.
  • (Act 2, scene 1: lines 33 – 64) Is this a dagger which I see before me… One actor required.
  • (Act 2, scene 2: lines 1 – end) King Duncan is murdered in his sleep. Two actors required.
  • (Act 3, scene 4: lines 32 – 88) Banquo’s ghost appears at Macbeth’s banquet. Four actors required.
  • (Act 4, scene 1: lines 46 – 134) The witches show Macbeth apparitions that convince him that he cannot be harmed. Four (or seven) actors required.
  • (Act 5, scene 1: lines 1 – end) Out, damned spot! Lady Macbeth walks and talks in her sleep, driven mad by her guilt. Three actors required.
  • (Act 5, scene 5: lines 7 – 27) Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow… His wife’s death sets Macbeth brooding on life’s futility. Two actors required (though one is a very minor role).

We will use the double lesson on Tuesday 15 July for rehearsing the scenes in the hall so bring your script (or don’t, if you don’t need it by then!) , props and a huge enthusiasm to take part and have fun!

10xEN1 – Rate my Lady Macbeth lesson

Following our lesson today on Lady Macbeth’s culpability in the murder of Duncan, I’d really appreciate your feedback on the lesson itself. Please note, the results are not published so please be as honest as you like. (In the spirit of honest feedback, please be honest with yourself too – did you try to get as much out of the lesson as you could?)