Year 9 – MBA for Tuesday 17 March

Please review the book you are in the middle of:
Book Reviews – House Rules

A Book Review for the Dartmouth Academy Reading Blog must be worth reading.
It must be between 100 and 250 words.
It must be organised and sequenced so that the reader understands fully what the reviewer thinks and how the reviewer feels.
It must connect to the reviewer’s personal experience (eg. reading history, personal interests or current state of mind)
Comparisons to other books and writers is appreciated. Original similes and metaphors are encouraged.
The review must mention the story, main character(s), style of writing and ideas/themes.
A short direct quotation from the book should be used as a sub-heading.

Example:

The Rider by Tim Krabbe
“Suffering you need; literature is baloney.”
Since being cajoled into taking up cycling by my colleagues two years ago, I’ve been reading a lot of cycling books, mainly autobiographies. Thus Amazon’s cookie-monsters put this ‘best evocation of a cycle race ever written’ onto my recommended list. And I’m glad they did, as it’s the best I’ve read. A true story in novel form, its short, sparse, sentences whir the reader kilometre by kilometre through the author’s cadences and cyclical thoughts – a philosophy of racing. I was transfixed from start to finish-line and read it in one go one morning, my teeth gritted and my feet desperately pressing imaginary pedals as I willed on the eponymous hero to his sprint-finish.
Tim Krabbe is a Dutch championship chess player, who turned to cycle-racing at the age of 29 and his book, a classic in Holland, is an introspective study into the mind of a professional cyclist; at times self-deprecating, at times arrogant, afraid of fast descents and afraid of defeat and constantly battling with pain and suffering in the pursuit of victory.
If you have never pushed your physical limits, you can find out what it is like by reading this short book– it is a great book , the lines of which will resonate through my mind for many years to come as a I rise in my saddle on another ascent around southwest England!

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17 thoughts on “Year 9 – MBA for Tuesday 17 March

  1. Jonah

    “You can only call someone crazy if there’s someone else who’s normal. Like good and evil. If everything was good, then nothing would be good.” I was encouraged to read this book in an English lesson and, since there was nothing else that I really wanted to read, I decided to give in a try. I’m not quite sure if I like it yet. The book is set in a dystopian future, where aliens try to invade the earth. But, instead of starting a ground war they decide to attack the humans in “waves” from their space ship orbiting from the sky. The story is fragmented at best, the writer uses different perspectives to paint an overall picture of the dystopian world. The action sequences in this book are just great but I feel that the story of one character is hard to remember after you have read two chapters about someone else. I would describe this book as the complicated hunger games, with a bit of Lord of the Rings, and I would encourage anyone to give this book a try.

    Reply
    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      It’s a great book – style, characterisation and storyline are exhilarating. And, Jonah, thank you for getting the review so spot on – just what we’re looking for!

      Sent from my iPad

      Reply
  2. Katie L

    Book- Matched by Allie Condie.

    “Those stories weren’t true. I know that. But tonight, it’s easy to forget.” Cassia is a seventeen year old who is watched by society, trapped by rules- a burden of existense. In Cassia’s society, officials decide who people love, how many children they have, where they work, where they die. On her birthday, Cassia is brought to a matching- an event created by the society and finds the love of her life- except he’s not.

    I’m not usually a big fan of romance novels, but this book is filled with a lot of plot twists and general enigma. I would reccommend this book to anyone who is interested in books that are gripping, yet romantic. This young adult trilogy is something worth reading if you’re up to something interesting.

    Reply
      1. Saul :P

        Friend or Foe by Friend or Foe by Michael Morpurgo.

        “The Boys looked on in silence, wondering how anybody could be that hungry”
        I don’t read much, I find it boring and time consuming. However, while reading this book whenever I had some time to spare I found myself reading it. The book is a very nicely written and a very good read.
        I picked up the book for a quick read and because of my familiarity of the author Michael Morpurgo. I personally didn’t think I would enjoy the book as much as I did and has challenged me to read more books.
        The book is based on two WW2 evacuees who start a new life in the countryside. One night they glimpse a German bomber crash near their village, the boys then go and try the plane and in doing so find the pilots.
        I would recommend this book to anyone who wants a book to get them into novels as it isn’t long but is very good read

  3. Chessie

    ‘Siege’ by Sarah Mussi;

    ‘People ask what you’d do in an emergency, like there’s time to plan. You can’t plan, you don’t think; you just do something.’

    Leah Jackson is the main 16 year old protagonist in an impromptu school shoot out. All hell lets loose when a teacher got shot in the head. Through this tense young adult novel, there is a structured story conveying fear and courage throughout. The whole genre of this story is an action/thriller, a review enclosed says ‘honest, powerful, intense’ which I have to say, I completely agree with, Mussi’s writing is compelling and unique and keeps you reading; I would compare her style to Rick Riordan’s. I would recommend this book to 14-17 year olds or people who are prepared for a tense read.

    Reply
  4. Saul :P

    Friend or Foe by Friend or Foe by Michael Morpurgo.

    “The Boys looked on in silence, wondering how anybody could be that hungry”
    I don’t read much, I find it boring and time consuming. However, while reading this book whenever I had some time to spare I found myself reading it. The book is a very nicely written and a very good read.
    I picked up the book for a quick read and because of my familiarity of the author Michael Morpurgo. I personally didn’t think I would enjoy the book as much as I did and has challenged me to read more books.
    The book is based on two WW2 evacuees who start a new life in the countryside. One night they glimpse a German bomber crash near their village, the boys then go and try the plane and in doing so find the pilots.
    I would recommend this book to anyone who wants a book to get them into novels as it isn’t long but is very good read

    Reply
  5. katie. s

    Paper Towns by John Green
    —-
    “a guy wearing a gray suit, slumped against the trunk of the oak tree. Not moving. This was new. He was encircled by blood; a half-dried fountain of it poured out of his mouth. The mouth open in a way that mouths generally shouldn’t be. Flies at rest on his pale forehead.
    “He’s dead,” Margo said, as if I couldn’t tell.”
    —-
    Paper Towns is a fantastic novel, as a teenager you can really connect to Quentin and Margo, and the struggles that they go through. Margo is an artist of disappearing tricks, and after a night of wild adventures and breaking and entering, she leaves a breadcrumb trail for Q. He tries to follow it – obviously – but what will he do when it leads nowhere?
    “The town was paper, but the memories were not.”
    By Katie Stevens.

    Reply
  6. Jenna

    The Scorch Trials by James Dashner

    ‘Thomas shifted in his bed, felt a darkness around him like air turned solid, pressing in. At first he panicked; his eyes snapped open as he imagined himself back in the Box—that horrible cube of cold metal that had delivered him to the Glade and the Maze. But there was a faint light, and lumps of dim shadow gradually emerged throughout the huge room. Bunk beds. Dressers. The soft breaths and gurgly snores of boys deep in slumber.’

    The Scorch Trials is the second book in The Maze Runner series, and after having read the first book I was desperate to read the second because of the tension that was building.

    At the start of this book, Thomas and the rest of the Gladers think they’re in the safe hands of the WICKED rebels. But much to their suprise, they find out things aren’t all what they thought…

    I highly reccomend this to fans of The Hunger Games and Divergent trilogy aged 13 – 17, as they are very similar in the terms of dystopian futures. You can relate to the main character, Thomas, because he’s confused and scared but has to be strong. I think I would also behave the same way in those conditions.

    Reply
  7. Frieder

    “The Walking Dead” is one of those zombie comics that have become very popular. The opening is all about a small town-cop waking up from a coma to find out that the world has been overrun by zombies and everything he knew and loved is missing or destroyed. But the story is not about the zmbies themselves it is all about the cop getting back to his family and trying to get back into a real life again. He and his friend go through horrible things and have to realize that nothing is like it was. The book series is open-ended and therefore you can only guess whats happening next. These books are mostly dark, painful and frequently moving. It is about how people survive and not what.

    Reply
  8. solomon

    George’s Marvellous Medicine is a children’s book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake, first published in 1981.
    My favourite character was George because he was very brave in making the marvellous medicine.
    My least favourite character was Grandma because she was nasty, cruel, disrespectful, selfish, and grumpy to George.
    The miserable old grandma told him go fetch her tea, give her her medicine and she forced him to eat cabbage but what is worse is that she tried to force him to eat crunchy, creepy crawlies
    I would highly recommend this book because it was amazing and I would mainly recommend it for 7 to 12 year olds.

    Reply
    1. Julius

      refugee boy
      benjamin zephaniah
      „ Father, that man who looked at the passports, what was wrong with him ?“
      „He looked alright to me.“
      I think think something was wrong with his hair, he looked burned. Did you see his hair? It was red, red like sunset, he looked hot he looked burned.“
      „refugee boy“ is a book by benjamin zephaniah, and it tells the story of a young Eritrean-Ethiopian or as he prefers to say „African“ boy, who comes to England after his family got attacked in both of his home countrys, as thei are in war with each other, and hate each other. He just arrived in England, as his father leaves him, and he has to live on his own. His fight for justice is shown in this book, and I think that it is a great book, not because it´s extremly thrilling, or because the style of writing is so awesome, it´s a great book becaue it´s about a contemporary issue, and something that made me think about my lifestyle and the way I think about refugees.
      I don´t recommend this book to people who only read for entertainment, because this book wants you to think about what it says. But I highly recommend it to people who are intrested in the world they are living in, and ready to put their way of treating othesr into questionm, and then are ready to change their minds.

      Reply
  9. Nele Pannewitz

    Allegiant
    by Veronica Roth
    from the Divergent series

    “Can I be forgiven for all I’ve done to get here?
    I want to be.”

    I read this book because I just finished another book series and I wanted to read something.
    As I’ve only read the first book of this series and as this one is the third, it wasn’t the best choice, but the second one wasn’t in the library. However I think it is worth reading it – even without knowing what happened in the second book.
    The plot developes quite fast – at least during the first 283 pages. At the beginning Tris and Tobias, the protagonists, are still living in the city they have grown up in but the former faction system is gone and one of the rebells rules the city now. They also know that there is a world outside the city and so they escape after a short time to find out what this world is like.
    The writing style of Veronica Roth is pretty good and easily and fluently to read. She writes short sentences but uses only a few metaphors or similes. Therefore it is clearly a young adult book.
    Although I really liked this book yet, it is worse than the first of the series. Many questions are left unanswered which is quite unsatisfacting because I’m sure they aren’t answered during the rest of the last book. The plot quite recently starts to develop inside the city and you really want to know if they are going to change that there is a absolute regime – again – they are leaving everything behind. At least they are going to a place that has the capability to change the life in the city but they make it clear, that they won’t during this book.
    However I enjoy reading it and I can only recommend it to those who already read at least the first book.

    Reply
  10. Andy Ryder

    Harry potter and The Prisoner of Askaban

    This is a very well written book by JK Rowling. It is one of my favourite Harry Potter books because of it’s gripping storyline and relatable charaters. It’s main charaters Harry Potter, Ron Weasly and Hermione Granger are relatable because of the close friendship between them. I like the way it is explores the impossible within the magic world. The descriptive sentences and the personallities of the characters really help to paint a picture in your head of the beautiful world of magic.
    In this particular Harry Potter book it uses time travel to make sense of the story line making it more surprising for the reader.
    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Askaban is definately a book worth reading especially for a fan of Harry Potter book or film. Also for any first time readers looking for a gripping story with magical features.

    Reply

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