PLE – 11xEN1 – Home learning due Wednesday 26 March

I really enjoyed today’s lesson with my newly-formed class. You’re a good bunch!

Your home learning task is to write or draw (with labels) your impressions of Portia based on Bassanio’s description of her in Act 1, scene 1.

By Wednesday 26 March (tomorrow), please.

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5 thoughts on “PLE – 11xEN1 – Home learning due Wednesday 26 March

  1. Daisy :)

    My impression on Portia from Act 1 scene 1 is that she is a blonde (‘and her sunny locks Hang on her temples like a golden fleece’), with fair skin (‘she is fair’), in respectable and good quality clothing (‘Wondrous values’ and ‘lady richly left’) and is attractive and slim (‘..many Jasons come in quest of her’ and ‘my little body’). Furthermore it she is way out of Bassanio league (‘had I but the means To hold a rival place with one of them,’).

    Reply
    1. Mr Legowski Post author

      Thanks Daisy. From we know about them both (even at this early stage of the play), do you really think Portia is anything less than Bassanio’s equal (at the very least!)? Is Portia’s comment above just the ‘gushings’ of a young woman in love?

      Reply
  2. Rhiannon

    Portia is portrayed as a rich woman from the phrase: “In Belmont is a lady richly left..” which suggests that money is a key importance for people coming to marry her. When she gets married, her possessions will belong to her husband, which appeals to Bassanio as he wants to pay off his debts to Antonio.

    Also she is shown to be beautiful as Bassanio explains to Antonio in the phrase: “And she is fair and—fairer than that word—
    Of wondrous virtues” which means that as well as being beautiful she is a good person, and so Bassanio can almost see her giving into his wishes if he can marry her, which is to have her money, however this phrase shows that he may actually have some form of love for her as he emanciates her as a wholesome person.

    Finally she is shown to be well known and a reputable woman: “Nor is the wide world ignorant of her worth,
    For the four winds blow in from every coast
    Renownèd suitors….” this suggests that she is clearly of great importance because many rich men across the world want to marry her, so she must have something good about her for people to know of her, which is her wealth and beauty, making Bassanio want to marry her for the rise in social status.

    Reply
  3. Rhiannon

    Portia is portrayed as a rich woman from the phrase: “In Belmont is a lady richly left…” which suggests that money is a key importance for people coming to marry her. When she gets married, all of her possessions will belong to her husband, which appeals to Bassanio as he sees it as an easy way to pay off his debts to Antonio.

    Also she is shown to be beautiful, as Bassanio explains to Antonio in the phrase: “And she is is fair and-fairer than that word-
    Of wondrous virtues” which means that as well as being beautiful she is a good person, so Bassanio is finding a way to use her fair judgement to his advantage, however he may actually love her as well as wanting her money as he is shown to emaciate her as a wholesome person.

    Finally she is shown to be a well known and reputable woman: “Nor is the wide world ignorant of her wort,
    For the four winds blow in from every coast
    Renowned suitors…” this suggests that she is clearly of great importance because many rich men from across the world are coming to marry her, so she must have something good about her, being her wealth and beauty. This makes Bassanio want to marry her because he sees it as a way to climb the ladder of society and increase his social status.

    Reply
    1. Mr Legowski Post author

      Thanks Rhiannon. This is a well-developed response, supported by many references to the text. One thing, though: you’ve said, ‘he is shown to emaciate her as a wholesome person’; do you mean ‘enunciate her…’? Even then I’m not sure that that’d be grammatically correct. I point this out simply as you are an unstoppable perfectionist!

      Reply

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