Year 11 – Of Mice and Men Christmas Revision introduction

Hi All. I’m setting a six part revision programme for the Christmas holiday and I’d really like you to complete it. Every time you answer the questions, you will receive House points. The questions are on the six chapters of ‘Of mice and men’ and focus on analysing language – something the mock showed we need to work on. I’ve aimed the questions at different grades – if in doubt, have a go at the C grade questions first and work your way up.
I’ll be marking the first set on 27th, 28th and 29th, then the next three on 2nd, 3rd and 4th for feedback. You could work to this schedule or do them early – get feedback on one in order to improve on the next – don’t do all six in one go!
Here’s the first extract and questions:
The first man stopped short in the clearing, and the follower nearly ran over him. He took off his hat and wiped the sweat-band with his forefinger and snapped the moisture off. His huge companion dropped his blankets and flung himself down and drank from the surface of the green pool; drank with long gulps, snorting into the water like
a horse. The small man stepped nervously beside him.
“Lennie!” he said sharply. “Lennie, for God’ sakes don’t drink so much.”
Lennie continued to snort into the pool. The small man leaned over and shook him by the shoulder.
“Lennie. You gonna be sick like you was last night.”
Lennie dipped his whole head under, hat and all, and then he sat up on the bank and his hat dripped down on his blue coat and ran down his back.
“That’s good,” he said. “You drink some, George. You take a good big drink.” He smiled happily.
George unslung his bindle and dropped it gently on the bank. “I ain’t sure it’s good water,” he said. “Looks kinda scummy.”
Lennie dabbled his big paw in the water and wiggled his fingers so the water arose in little splashes; rings widened across the pool to the other side and came back again. Lennie watched them go.
“Look, George. Look what I done.”
George knelt beside the pool and drank from his hand with quick scoops. “Tastes all right,” he admitted. “Don’t really seem to be running, though. You never oughta drink water when it ain’t running, Lennie,” he said hopelessly. “You’d drink out of a gutter if you was thirsty.” He threw a scoop of water into his face and rubbed it
about with his hand, under his chin and around the back of his neck. Then he replaced his hat, pushed himself back from the river, drew up his knees and embraced them.
Lennie, who had been watching, imitated George exactly. He pushed himself back, drew up his knees, embraced them, looked over to George to see whether he had it just right. He pulled his hat down a little more over his eyes, the way George’s hat was.

How is language used to show the relationship between George and Lennie?

Aiming for a C – explain your answers fully writing in full sentences, using short quotations to support each;
(a) who uses the orders in the dialogue?
(b) who gives the advice?
(c) what does Lennie’s body language in the last paragraph say about him?

Aiming for a B –
(a) why is George shown to lead the two men when they are walking?
(b) who uses imperatives – how can we tell the tone of voice that is used?
(c) how does Steinbeck use George’s body language (towards the end of the passage) to portray the way he is feeling? – By copying him, does Lennie show that he understands George’s feelings?

Aiming for an A –
(a) Lennie is shown to almost bump into George – does this suggest that Lennie is a help or a hindrance to George? Why does he not actually bump into him but use the adverb ‘nearly’?
(b)what does the animal imagery (find three quotes) suggest about Lennie and how he might be seen by George?
(c)How is Lennie’s movement contrasted with George’s?

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48 thoughts on “Year 11 – Of Mice and Men Christmas Revision introduction

  1. Simon MP

    C-/A) George is the one that uses decisive command orders to Lennie. He says this. “Lennie. You gonna be sick like you was last night.” This also means that he didn’t learn his lesson from last time. Expressing that Lennie forgot. That George has to look after him as some sort of parent. Another point that the extract show George a parent and is able to rely on is. “He threw a scoop of water into his face and rubbed it
    about with his hand, under his chin and around the back of his neck. Then he replaced his hat, pushed himself back from the river, drew up his knees and embraced them.
    Lennie, who had been watching, imitated George exactly. He pushed himself back, drew up his knees, embraced them, looked over to George to see whether he had it just right. He pulled his hat down a little more over his eyes, the way George’s hat was.” This is showing some sort of respect and showing that Lennie is following orders by himself.

    Reply
    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      Good answer, Simon. Keep your quotations to under 7 words long – pick out key phrases rather than long passages. Rather than put, ‘George uses decisive command phrases’ write, ‘Steinbeck gives George decisive command orders’ to show it was the writer’s choice to make George appear as the leader between the two.

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  2. Simon MP

    C-/B) George is the person that gives the advise. Just by the first word aiming at Lennie. “Lennie!” he said sharply. “Lennie, for God’ sakes don’t drink so much.” Also. “Lennie. You gonna be sick like you was last night.” This is some advice to remember what happened last time he consumed the same amount of water. George is also a role model for Lennie. Lennie is getting advice just by watching George. Copying the movements that George is doing at that exact moment. Learning attitude and how to act in a social life. The extract shows this by saying. “Lennie, who had been watching, imitated George exactly. He pushed himself back, drew up his knees, embraced them, looked over to George to see whether he had it just right. He pulled his hat down a little more over his eyes, the way George’s hat was.” This is showing some sort of respect and showing that Lennie is following orders by himself.”

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    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      Good answer – you explain yourself fully and write at length. Could you be more specific about the type of language used? The exclamation mark? Or the use of detailed description of body language at that point?

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  3. Simon MP

    C-/C) Lennie is expressed as a giant, beast like character. When it says. “His huge companion dropped his blankets and flung himself down and drank from the surface of the green pool; drank with long gulps, snorting into the water like a horse.” Steinbeck is describing Lennie has the personally of some animal that romes around. The extract is also showing that Lennie is an person that will do anything to survive. Saying that he will drink from a pool that contains a sheet of green across the pool. He also flung himself down. As if he didn’t care where he was sitting. Also describing that he has been walking for hours to end. And ran out of energy.

    “Drank with long gulps, snorting into the water like.” Saying the fact tat he is rushing the water down like this is a treat, and rarely been seen. This also saying that he is some sort of animal. “Lennie dabbled his big paw in the water and wiggled his fingers so the water arose in little splashes.” This is the one that is the most effective. Saying that he is a bear. so you can imagine how big his hands are. After. It says. That he waggled his fingers. As if they were a dogs tail. The water arose in small splashes. Expressing his strength.

    “Lennie, who had been watching, imitated George exactly. He pushed himself back, drew up his knees, embraced them, looked over to George to see whether he had it just right. He pulled his hat down a little more over his eyes, the way George’s hat was.” Lennie is copying George body posture and movements. As if he was ready to fight. The way Lennie did it was exact. As if he is trying to get a new attitude.

    Reply
    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      Us terms like ‘metaphor’ and ‘simile’ as you explain your points. You have answered well but MUST focus on how language is used by the writer. If you click on the of mice and men page in the header bar you will find the second set of questions (for tomorrow!) Well done – first house points for you!

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  4. Gemma Collings

    Aiming for a C –
    (a) who uses the orders in the dialogue?
    Steinbeck shows George is Lennie’s minder and instructor. He’s always telling him what to do and how to behave.’The first man stopped short in the clearing, and the follower nearly ran over him.’ This notifies the reader of the kind of relationship between George and Lennie, George is the parent and Lennie is the child. It also tells us that the person at the front (George) is responsible and the leader. When George says, “I ain’t sure it’s good water”. This again shows the idea of George being the responsible, as he has to tell Lennie this and Lennie can’t tell himself. It also shows us that George is concerned over Lennie’s health.

    Reply
    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      Good answer, Gemma. But can you see the self-doubt George has? While he is responsible, he is very unsure of himself. This creates great conflict and realism in the story – he is far from perfect and does not have all the answers – he’s just an ordinary guy who is forced into his position as leader.

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  5. Rhiannon

    (a) Steinbeck shows that Lennie is a hindrance to George. The fact that he almost stumbles over George shows that he is clumsy and unaware of what he is doing. This is George’s responsibility: to look out for both his and Lennie’s welfare, which shows that there is a domineering element in their relationship. Lennie is more portrayed as a pet to George because he simply obeys commands, as Steinbeck suggests, George has some control over Lennie:
    “Lennie!” he said sharply. ‘Lennie, for God’ sakes don’t drink so much.’
    Lennie continued to snort into the pool. The small man leaned over and shook him by the shoulder.”
    This shows that George is acting like a parent, commanding a small child on what to do and exactly when to do it. Lennie cannot, or does not consider his actions and the consequences behind them, because he doesn’t have to. George tells him how to behave, and has to constantly remind him that his actions has consequences. Steinbeck uses the adverb ‘nearly’ when Lennie almost stumbles over George because he wants to show that George clearly has his own spacial awareness and can see that Lennie doesn’t have a clue as to how to be aware of his environment and what surrounds him, so George acts as his brain. It also shows that Lennie has to become aware of his surroundings and take some responsibility for his actions. He is also portrayed as simple and animalistic because he stumbles, which make his movements seem clumsy and uncontrolled. This would make him a hindrance to George because of his companion not being able to move swiftly and quickly, nor think on his feet because of the fact that he imitates George exactly, afraid to make the wrong move.

    (b) From the extract, Lennie is proven to be bear like:
    “Lennie dabbled his big paw in the water and wiggled his fingers so the water arose in little splashes; rings widened across the pool to the other side and came back again.”
    The use of the metaphor ‘dabbled his paw’ suggests that he has animalistic features and that he has big hands. He also has a big frame, and is shown to ‘stumble’, meaning that he obviously has a hard time functioning in his body, and moves around like a bear chasing its’ prey.

    Also, he is proven to act like a dehydrated beast:
    “His huge companion dropped his blankets and flung himself down and drank from the surface of the green pool; drank with long gulps, snorting into the water like a horse.”
    The fact that he flings himself down shows that he is desperate to have a drink, as though he hadn’t in weeks, and despite the fact that the water is covered with a layer of green doesn’t deter him, in fact, he doesn’t really care because he has run out of energy and patience. also, Steinbeck refers to him ‘snorting into the water like a horse.’ This shows that Lennie is appreciating the water, despite what it may contain.

    Finally, he is represented as clumsy:
    “The first man stopped short in the clearing, and the follower nearly ran over him.”
    Lennie is acting like a wild beast that roams the clearing, with no sense of direction until something obstructs his path, bringing him to his senses. However though, he then comes to his senses, startled by George in his path, who may have been intimidated because of Lennie not being aware of him. This then makes George realise how much bigger than him that Lennie is.

    Overall, George sees Lennie as an animal who is desperate to survive, however relies completely on him as he does not have the brains to figure out, which has been shown by the fact he almost stumbled over George when he had suddenly stopped, meaning that he is unaware of the happenings in the surroundings around him, despite having the bearlike features and the strength, he would survive without wits, which he does not possess as he is evidently slower than George, who realises this when he drinks the water like there is no tomorrow and scolds him for it.

    (c) Clearly, George is much quicker and moves faster, as he possesses the necessary wits, whereas Lennie is much slower and tends to follow George:
    “The first man stopped short in the clearing, and the follower nearly ran over him. He took off his hat and wiped the sweat-band with his forefinger and snapped the moisture off. His huge companion dropped his blankets and flung himself down…”
    This shows that George is the leader of the two because he walks in front, checking for any dangers, which Lennie would fail to spot because of the fact that he is unaware of things that George can easily pick out. Also Steinbeck refers to Lennie as ‘his huge companion’ which will obviously hinder any kind of movement because with his bigger frame it is harder to move at a quicker pace, compared to that of George, who is much smaller and more nimble than him. Another important contrast in the movement is that George knows knows what he is doing: Lennie often copies him to make sure that he gets it right:
    “Lennie, who had been watching, imitated George exactly. He pushed himself back, drew up his knees, embraced them, looked over to George to see whether he had it just right.”
    It shows that George completely dominates Lennie’s movements to make sure he doesn’t get himself into trouble as he has previously done, because George wasn’t there to stop him from making mistakes. The fact that he has to copy George shows how limited Lennie’s thinking is, because he does not act for himself, he does things to please George and avoid getting into trouble with him, which shows that he is almost afraid of George.

    Reply
    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      Great answers Rhiannon. For the others (the second is already on the page in the header – of Mice and Men), see if you can distil your answers – this is only a section b, which you have to answer in under ten minutes in the exam – the three parts here (a, b, c) are there to represent the three paragraphs you have to write. Can you get as much depth across in fewer words? You show a really intelligent reading of the novel, but can you get it across as succinctly as the exam requires? I’m really impressed and hope you will achieve an A* your work rate deserves this summer.

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  6. Sam Burgess

    who uses the orders in the dialogue?
    Steinbeck shows George is Lennie’s minder and instructor. He’s always telling him what to do and how to behave.’The first man stopped short in the clearing, and the follower nearly ran over him.’ This notifies the reader of the kind of relationship between George and Lennie, George is the parent and Lennie is the child. It also tells us that the person at the front (George) is responsible and the leader. When George says, “I ain’t sure it’s good water”. This again shows the idea of George being the responsible, as he has to tell Lennie this and Lennie can’t tell himself. It also shows us that George is concerned over Lennie’s health.

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  7. Sam Burgess

    Aiming for a (B)
    A: George leads because throughout the book we can see that Lennie is highly defendant on George. For example “Lennie, for God’ sake don’t drink so much.” We can see that George is telling Lennie what to do and what not to do. We know this because Lenny is mentally challenged, and so he is not capable of finding food, shelter, jobs, etc. George needs to find him work and provide him with basic needs as well as mental support, because Lenny doesn’t have a lot of friends. He also subconsciously depends on George to keep out of trouble. This is because of his obsession with soft, furry objects that he likes to feel and touch which we see throughout the book with the mouse, the dog and Curley’s wife’s hair which puts him into trouble at the end of the book.

    B: The person who uses the most imperatives is more obviously George. An imperative is a “command verb” which we can instantly assume that George, the parent figure will use them the most. For example “Lennie, for God’ sake don’t drink so much.” This we can see the imperative ” Don’t drink so much” George is commanding Lennie not to do something. The tone we can assume is very viscous because of the type of men and what society they live in. The book is set in the 1930’s which was a time of recession. This portrays how the men on the farm are doing all they can to get their money and that’s all they care about. On the other hand George and Lennie have a special relationship which shows how they care for each other unlike the other characters.

    C: George shows his responsibility for Lennie by telling him what to do “You never oughta drink water when it ain’t running, Lennie” This shows how he controls Lennie as a parent like figure. Secondly we can see how exhausted George is “He threw a scoop of water into his face and rubbed it about with his hand, under his chin and around the back of his neck.” This shows how hot it is and how far George and Lennie will go for work. We can also see how hopeless George is because not only is he trying to find work, he has to look after Lennie at the same time. Thirdly he is overwhelmed and exasperated “Then he replaced his hat, pushed himself back from the river, drew up his knees and embraced them.” this is because he has so much responsibility on his shoulders. Overall Steinbeck portrays the feeling desperate times during a recession and how George comes across as very desperate to find work.

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    1. Sam Burgess

      In addition I think that Lennie doesn’t understand Georges emotions because he doesn’t have the capacity to. He copies him because he wants to be like George this is because of Georges role model type figure.

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    2. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      I like your focus on the last question on the harsh conditions – it is hot (and dirty). What exactly does his posture show he is feeling? I wonder how everyone else will interpret it. What about Lennie’s instructions? (Spell ‘Lennie’ correctly).

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  8. Jess Branton

    a) In the extract, Lennie uses the orders that have been given. Lennie is often described as an animal or as a child. “Snorting into the water like a horse.” Lennie also isn’t that intelligent, so George is left to take care of him. Lennie then follows all advice he has been given by George. George also has to correct Lennie for anything he has done wrong. “You gonna be sick like you were last night.” To be honest George must really care for Lennie because many people won’t do what George does.

    b) George is the person who gives Lennie all the orders and advice on what to do and not to do. George is almost left to look after Lennie, ever since he promised Lennie’s aunt Clara, that he would look after him. George is loyal to Lennie, for example looking after things, keeping him out of trouble and also telling Lennie useful advice and orders.

    c) Lennie presents his body language in a childish manner. “Rings widened across the pool to the other side and came back again. Lennie watched them go.” By that quote that is the sort of thing that young children do. That quote matches the description of Lennie and a child, because of the way how Lennie acts and shows his body language.

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    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      Thanks for getting straight onto this Jess. There are two more sets already posted and three more to come. Mention ‘the writer’ and ‘the reader’ to show you are observing what Steinbeck is doing and what effect it has on the reader. So for this first extract, you need to move on to saying how the writer is trying very quickly to set up a relationship between the two men at the very start of the book. (Lennie doesn’t show his body language’ – Steinbeck portrays Lennie’s body language through his writing) Lennie watches the rings of water with the fascination of a child – Steinbeck is comparing his movements and the way he directs his attention to that of a child to show he is not a fully functioning adult who needs looking after. You don’t need to put in ‘many people won’t do what George does’ – you need to mention ‘characters’ rather than ‘people’. Well done for moving straight onto this – great, winning attitude – use the feedback for your next answer (tomorrow?) ________________________________________

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  9. Jake Robinson

    (a) why is George shown to lead the two men when they are walking?
    In the extract George is shown to be leading the two men because he is the more dominant one of the two and Lennie is very dependant on him. You can see that George sort of looks after lennie where he says “Lennie, for God’ sakes don’t drink so much.” This represents George as almost mothering Lennie because he doesn’t have anyone else to do it for him and is not capable of doing basic things by himself. George is portrayed as a role model for Lennie so Lennie may just be following George because he looks up to him and feels as though he should be doing what George is doing because that is the right thing to do.

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    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      A suitable answer, Jake, but how could you ensure you are focusing on the way the writer uses language to affect the reader? This is the first time we are presented with the two main characters and immediately we are given the image of George in the lead and Lennie behind. It is a first impression (which remains as our impression throughout the novel). Moving from your answer to one that attempts to explain explicitly what the author is doing to express ideas is how you raise your marks.
      Well done for starting to work on this – it will take time and practice to improve, but you are doing the right thing making a start – the sooner you address this, the higher your chances (you scored 3 on this section in the mock and need to score 4 or 5 at least).

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  10. Rob

    Aiming for a C:

    George uses all of the orders in the dialogue. He says things like “for god sake Lennie don’t drink so much”. It’s almost like George is in control of Lennie as he can’t do stuff for himself. George says to Lennie “you never oughta drink water if it ain’t running”. This is George giving Lennie advice about drinking water. George has to spoon feed Lennie really. He body language shows that he is child like and he looks up to George and does anything he’s says.

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    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      Rob, while you are answering the questions and using quotations, you need to analyse the way it is written. The use of the word ‘dialogue’ is commendable and the explanation is clear. But this is a LANGUAGE question, so you need to write more like this: ‘while George gives all the orders and uses blasphemy (‘for god sake’) to show his strength of feeling, the author still has him use the epithet (name) ‘Lennie’ to show George cares about Lennie enough to soften the way he talks to him by using his name.
      Well done for getting on to this during the holidays – how many can you do before Monday?

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  11. Cassie

    Aiming for a C-
    a) In this extract Steinbeck shows that George is ordering Lennie, he snaps at him “Lennie! he said sharply” it shows that George is controlling and becomes angry quickly. Steinbeck has shown the reader that George is also caring towards Lennie “Lennie. You gonna be sick” this also shows the reader how George is like a big brother to Lennie, he is responsible and takes care of Lennie because he doesn’t know how to do it himself. It also mentions about George working in front and Lennie following it describes Lennie as ‘the follower’ this shows that George gives the orders as he is walking in front with a follower. It also shows that he can be quite domineering.

    b) Steinbeck tells the reader that in this extract George is the person who gives advice. He is concerned about Lennie drinking the water, he says “Lennie, for God’ sakes don’t drink so much.” after Lennie carries on drinking he tells George its good water and he should drink some George replies by saying “I ain’t sure it’s good water.” Steinbeck shows that George is very protective over Lennie, he is worried that the water will make him sick but Lennie doesn’t listen to him so he makes his voice more stern to give him advice on the water.

    c) In the paragraph Steinbeck describes Lennie like a giant childish animal, “Lennie, who had been watching, imitated George exactly” this shows that Lennie imitates people mainly George because he looks up to him and that’s what children do, they look up to their idols. Lennie sees George getting up from the water and copies his exact movements “He pushed himself back, drew up his knees, embraced them, looked over to George to see whether he had it just right.” His childish manner is shown here, he has copied George’s exact movements and even had to look back to make sure he had done it completely correct.

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    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      Great response Cassie – a 4, I’d say. To move to a 5, you need to be more specific with terms such as ‘simile’ and ‘metaphor’ or ‘colloquial’. I like your use of short quotes and you explain yourself really well. ________________________________________

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  12. Jake Robinson

    (b) who uses imperatives – how can we tell the tone of voice that is used?
    The person who uses imperitives in the extract is George. An imperative is “giving an authoritative command” and George is shown as the more authoritative one here. An example of an imperative that George uses is “Lennie, for God’ sakes don’t drink so much.” You can tell the way that George speaks because just before it says “George said sharply”. This suggests that he says it quite firmly and in a way that Lennie knows George expects him to do what he is told. George is also saying it for Lennie’s own safety so he needs to let Lennie know this by how powerfully he says it.

    (c) how does Steinbeck use George’s body language…
    I don’t really know what emotions Steinbeck is trying to portray by the way he is describing George’s body language. It might be that he is fed up with having to move around all of the time or frustrated with Lennie for what we find out later in the book that happened in weed with the girl. I don’t think that Lennie understands George’s emotions and copies him because of this reason because earlier in the book it describes him as drinking like a horse and George is having to tell him not to do things that he should know himself. This shows that he is not quite normal and so I think he is just copying George because he looks up to him as a role model.

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    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      Does George show he cares for Lennie by speaking ‘sharply’. How does the adverb emphasise the way he feels about his companion? Don’t put ‘I don’t know how he’s feeling – you know as much as I do – he’s a fictional character and he is feeling however we think he is feeling! I would say that the way he rubs his face with water shows that he is exhausted, dirty and needs to refresh himself. His body language as he settles down is full of tension isn’t it? He is kind of protecting himself from the outside world but pushing his hat back at the same time – it’s like he wants to relax, but his situation means he can’t. You are spot on that Lennie doesn’t understand – he just admires George and copies him because he thinks it is the right thing to do and he thinks he won’t be told off if he does just like George does – but as you say, his learning difficulties means he shows very little understanding of George’s feelings. Your interpretation is as valid as mine, Jake.

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  13. Aimee Felton

    Aiming for a B

    (A) George is shown to lead the two men because he is more mentally stable, we can see throughout the book that Steinbeck presents Lennie as childlike and a lot less mentally stable than George. This is shown when Steinbeck uses the simile of ‘snorting into the water like a horse’ this shows Lennie doesn’t really do things in normal ways, Therefore George acts like a father figure to Lennie and leads him through his life within the novel. We can see when George says to Lennie ‘Lennie, for god’ sakes don’t drink so much’ that George puts him In order and tells him what to do, this shows that Lennie does as George says and leads George in what he does.

    (B) in this extract George is shown to give the most imperatives, an imperative is commanding someone to do something which is clearly shown to be George in the novel. We can see that George commands Lennie to do things to keep him safe or to take care of him as George is the father figure and the role model to Lennie. We can see when George says ‘sharply’ ‘Lennie, for god’ sakes don’t drink so much’ that George is commanding Lennie to do something. Steinbeck has emphasised the command by saying that George said is ‘sharply’ suggesting that he is snapping at Lennie to do something (commanding). Further more we can see in the extract that George knows Lennie well enough to know what he is like and knows when to give an imperative to tell him to stop, this is shown when George says to Lennie ‘Lennie. Your gonna be sick like you was last night.’ This proves that George knows when to command Lennie to do something, this is also shown later in the novel.

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    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      Just about a B grade Aimee. The three parts here, a, b and c would be three possible paragraphs for section (b) in the exam, which should only take ten minutes to write! How are you going to make these three points about language (remember, three paragraphs per question) in the time available? The key is to use terminology, like you do with the words ‘simile’ and ‘imperative’ showing your focus on the language. Happy new year – there are three more sections posted and another one will be posted today!

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  14. Joel Atwell

    Aiming for a B,
    A) George is shown to lead the way in the book because Steinbeck presents him as a mature guardian to Lennie, Lennie is presented to be childlike and immature to the persons eye. To show that Lennie follows George’s orders Steinbeck adds in “Lennie, who had been watching, imitated George exactly.” This line proves that with out George, Lennie would just be incapable to live and to survive on his own. He also adds the line “his companion” this shows that Lennie is George’s side kick/ apprentice and means that Lennie follows and looks up to George.
    B) In the extract George is shown to give out most of the commands within the duo. This is because he is the more ‘mentally stabled’ one and he is the guy Lennie looks up to. In my previous paragraph its says that Lennie imitated George exactly. Maybe by doing this he wouldn’t get shouted at or get a telling off. It was simpler to do just what his mentor did.

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    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      By picking out individual words and phrases, you are showing an awareness of the language devices, as well as using phrases and words such as ‘presented’ and ‘to show’. This is a B grade answer. To raise your grade you might want to look in more detail at characterisation – while George is the leader is he comfortable in that role? Does he enjoy the role or is it shown to be a chore? Adding this kind of thinking takes you beyond the ‘this word does that’ answer to a more complex and sophisticated response to the passage. ________________________________________

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  15. joshua rogers

    Aiming for a c
    1) Steinbeck shows that George gives the orders by making George shout at Lennie when he is drinking to much water. He shouts “Lennie!” To assert dominance and to get lennies attention. He then goes on to say “Lennie, for god’ sakes don’t drink so much”. This line shows that George gives the orders in the pair and Lennie has to follow them.

    2) Out of the two that are by the pool, George is the one who gives the advice to Lennie, telling him not to “drink so much” and “you never oughta drink water when it ain’t running, Lennie”. These lines show that George is like a carer for Lennie, always telling him what to do and always giving the advice, even though most of the time he knows that Lennie won’t listen.

    3) The body language that Lennie shows in the last paragraph shows that Lennie is like a child, as he is always copying George by having to do everything that George follows exactly. Also, it shows that Lennie cannot think for himself, as he always has to look to George for confirmation as to whether he is doing it right or not

    Reply
    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      This would be a C Josh. To move up a grade, Try to look AT&T from the perspective of the writer – how he’s giving specific information to make an impression on the reader. Why is the direct speech (dialogue) so effective?

      Sent from my iPad

      >

      Reply
  16. Joy

    A) Steinbeck shows George is the one giving the orders, he is the one to keep care of Lennie and tells him off for doing stupid things: “Lennie, for God’ sakes don’t drink so much.”; this shows that George cares about Lennie and his well being. Even so it is evident to the reader that George isn’t sure of himself when giving out these commands, Steinbeck uses language to demonstrate this,’The small man stepped nervously beside him’, the adverb, ‘nervously’ shows the uncertainty George has in himself when giving out these orders.

    B) George is shown to be the one giving the advice, much like a parent to a child. He shows himself to be the elder in mind by his advice to Lennie, and quiet reprimand when Lennie does something unwise “You never oughta drink water when it ain’t running, Lennie,” and “Lennie. You gonna be sick again like you was last night”. He advises Lennie on proper actions as someone worldly advising someone naive.

    C) Lennie’s body language shows him as childish and eager to please, ‘Lennie, who had been watching, imitated George exactly’; Lennie is shown as a child eager to please their father figure, even going as far as to check if he had done it right, he ‘looked over to George to see whether he had it just right’. George is Lennie’s Idol and he wants to be just like him.

    Reply
    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      Good answers here, Joy. I especially like the way you have picked out the word ‘nervously’. Why do you think Steinbeck does not portray George as a commanding, confident figure, but one who is unsure of himself? What effect does it have, having this kind of person as the protagonist (main character)? ________________________________________

      Reply
  17. Josie

    Aiming for a b
    A) George is shown as get more dominant person in th friendship. This is when in he line “Lennie!” He said sharply, “Lennie, for god sakes don’t drink so much” this implies that George is ordering Lennie what to do; Steinbeck uses the word sharply which portrays to he reader that by snapping at his friend it will force Lennie to act upon what George is ordering him to do. Steinbeck also uses the line “looked over to George,to see whether he had it just right” this symbolises that Lennie ids dependant on George, as Lennie is unsure of what to do so therefore he mimcs e action of his parent- like friend; without George Lennie would be lost and wouldn’t know what to do with himself.
    B) Imperatives are shown in the xtract through the charactor of George. This is shown clearly in he line”Lennie, for gods sakes, don’t drink so much”. An imperative is a request. We are asking someone to do something. This is shown in the line; George is forcing Lennie to stop drinking from the lake; it also shows the lennies well being is important to George and by pressuring him to stop will help him even if the way it’s being said is harsh.
    C) George’s body language is portrayed as tired and frustrated by the fact that he is lumbered with Lennie, who is quite childlike. This is shown by the line ” Lennie, who had been watching, imitated George. This portrays hat lennies doesn’t know what to do next and that he is dependant on Georgie and so therefore he mimics George’s actions to keep Georgie from shouting at him.

    Reply
    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      I like your interpretation of the last part here, Josie – he copies him because he doesn’t know what else to do! An imperative is more an order than a request. It immediately shows who’s in charge, doesn’t it? Lennie’s behaviour shows his lack of caution and George’s shows his uncertainty and pessimism -he’s the one who has to take responsibility for the reckless man-child. ________________________________________

      Reply
  18. Teagan Webster :)

    Aiming for a B:

    a) George is shown as the leader in the beginning of the chapter because he is that of a father figure to Lennie. This is later explained that George is like a father figure or a ‘leader’ to Lennie because he is very child-like and cannot be independant. The quotation from George saying: “You’d drink out of a gutter if you was thirsty” tells the reader that Lennie is perhaps not all that bright. It also tells us George must have known him for a while as it sounds as if he knows what Lennie is like.

    b) The character using imperatives in the extract is definately George, because he is often telling Lennie what to do as father-figure as we know Lennie is childlike and needs assistance on what to do right. In the extract, George says to Lennie “Lennie!” George said sharply. “For God’ sakes don’t drink so much!” This shows George is looking out for Lennie because he know Lennie is less capable.

    Furthermore, throughout the rest of the novel, George carries on to guide Lennie, for instance in the opposite part of the novel in chapter six, in the same setting as chapter one, George guides Lennie back to the clearing and tells him to think of their ‘American Dream’ before George shoots him. Also, George killing Lennie is showing another, possibly dark, act of kindness and guidance from George as he is killing him so he does not have to suffer any worse from Curley and the other men on the ranch, who would have brutally hurt and killed him instead.

    c) In the extract, Steinbeck portrays George’s body language of that of being exahusted and stressed. The way he describes how “He threw a scoop of water over his face and rubbed it around his face, under his chin and arojnd the back of his neck.” This tells the reader he may have been travelling for days and not washed, and wants to feels cleaner and refreshed. His body language also shows that he is stressed, and he is maybe trying to think.

    By Lennie mimicking George’s actions, I do not think that it shows that Lennie understands George’s feelings. I believe Lennie just wants to be like George, is it is shown that he looks up to George and is inluenced highly by him. I think Lennie wants to be like George so he can feel like he can fit in with someone, which shows an element of a low self confidence or self worth.

    Reply
    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      These answers are fine, Teagan. Don’t use ‘I’ in the answers – be authoritative and leave the ‘I believe’ out. the first point about George is that the author uses imagery – he shows George literally leading – the reader has a mental image to confirm the relationship between the two men. You need to focus on what the author is doing with language.
      I like your final point about Lennie’s low self-confidence – does he have ANY self-awareness?

      Reply
  19. Jake Billings

    A) In the extract, George is giving orders to Lenny when he says “Lennie, for Gods sakes, don’t drink too much”. The use of the word “don’t” is an imperative as he is demanding that Lenny doesn’t drink too much and doesn’t really give him any other option. This shows that George has some form of control over Lenny.
    B) In the extract, George also gives advice to Lenny; “You never oughta drink water when it ain’t running Lenny.”. The fact that George says “oughta” implies that he is simply advising Lenny, not demanding that he has to.
    C) In the last paragraph, Lenny’s body language suggests that he is very fond of George and that they share a close relationship. “He pulled his hat down a little more over his eyes, the way George’s hat was.”, implies that Lenny admires George and that George is a huge influence in his life because he is beginning to copy the way George is.

    Reply
    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      Hello Jake – better late than never! Have a read of some of the other answers on the blog – yours are on the short side. keep focusing on what the author is trying to communicate (rather than what is happening in the story). what is he showing about the relationship? How does he feel about Lennie if he gives advice? ________________________________________

      Reply
  20. James

    1. In the extract George is the one with the authority giving orders like in the line ” Don`t drink too much.” . The fact that George is first to speak and it`s an order imidiently establishes his dominant position over Lennie and displays his control over him.
    2. George gives Lennie advice in the line ” You never oughta drink water when it ain`t running Lennie.”. The presentation of it being advice through the word “oughta” makes George seem less like a controlling person and more like a friend or fatherly type of person, making their relationship more supportable by the reader.
    3. Lennie`s body language is seen to be mimickery of George`s. It is seen in the line ” Lennie, who had been watching, imitated George exactly” . The imitation of George makes Lennie appear to look up to him and want to be like him. This suggests a parent-child relationship between the two.

    Reply
  21. merlin

    aiming for a B:
    (A) the way Lennie is following so close that “[he] nearly ran over [George]” is Steinbeck’s way of showing Lennie’s dependents on George. when it tells us that they are walking in single file it suggests that Lennie can’t fine his own way and need help, the same way that a child or someone with learning disability’s would need help. By putting this at the beginning of the story it immediately tells the reader that George is like a father figure or career for Lennie.

    It also portrays the way that George is superayer to Lennie. by George walking in front, it tells the reader that he is more prepared to deal with any problems they might bump into. Even if it was something as simple as know what way to turn at a turning. by George walking first it also tells the reader that he is the one that makes the dissensions. the way Lennie is hidden by him tells us that he has no say in the matter. if the two men walked side by side it would suggest that they were equal the way friends walk side by side, however they walk in a way telling us that George is the leader of their paths. this is the first way Steinbeck suggests that he has learning difficulty.

    (B) Steinbeck doesn’t use proper gamer within the dialog in the extract. when George is telling Lennie to stop drinking the water he says “I ain’t sure it’s good water,”
    the grammatically caret way to say this is ‘I am not sure if that is good drinking water’, but he doesn’t, this portrays way they both speck in the same manner in witch purely educated people would talk. by doing that it helps to tell us what kind of life they live, making us the reader have pity for them.
    it also makes the reader feel more as if they are really people and this story is much more realistic.

    The way that George specks to Lennie is the way that a farther would talk to a son. Backing up that father figure idea i spoke of earlier. it is a very sharp and to the point way of talking, adding a scene of urgency to what he says. when George is trying to make Lennie stop drinking he says “Lennie, for God’ sakes don’t drink so much.” he then follows it with “Lennie. You gonna be sick like you was last night.” this is George telling Lennie to do something and then telling him why. this is the way someone would talk to a young child.

    (C) there is a very calm attitude to what he is doing, this tells the reader that he feeling in control and safe. when George gets hes blanket out he “[drops] it gently on the bank” suggesting no sharp movements and a peaceful attitude to the passage. By Lennie copying him it tells the reader that this is what Lennie wants is the be calm and feel in control like George dose. this dose not however mean that Lennie know how George feels, he just know how he acts, i don’t believe that Lennie truly understands what emotions are and is incapable of dealing with them properly. This is why he copes George, in the way he acts.

    Reply
  22. Savannah

    A) Lennie is shown in the extract to be a hindrance to George. George is shown to lead Lennie, almost as a parent, or guardian. This is shown when George instructs Lennie.” “Lennie!” he said sharply. “Lennie, for God’ sakes don’t drink so much.” ” This portrays George as responsible for Lennie, and therefore creates the idea that Lennie is a burden on George. Lennie also appears to be quite frustrating to George, with Lennie constantly mimicing him, but being unable to quite copy.This is shown with “the follower nearly ran over him”. The writer uses the word “nearly” to show that Lennie is not as aware as George and his actions are less controlled. It also gives the idea that Lennie follows George automatically, unaware of the setting or situation, and when George stops, it takes Lennie a while longer to adjust, therefore nearly bumping into him. This makes Lennie appear to be a hindrance, as he attempts to copy George but is never quite able to, which means he is always struggling so George has to help. In addition, as Lennie never thinks for himself about the situation and relies on George, literally and metaphorically following him, George has to look after him and has a responsibility over him like a parent, which pulls him back and drags him down.

    B) Lennie is portrayed as clumsy yet powerful, with animal imagery. “Lennie dabbled his big paw in the water”. The word “dabbled” creates an image of Lennie not having much control over his hand and the phrase “big paw” makes it seem oversized and un-coordinated. The word “paw” conveys an image of a bear, which reflects Lennie’s build, as he is a tall, strong man. This show of Lennie’s clumsiness and lack of control foreshadows later on in the book, as Lennie kills a puppy accidentally and then, much more drastically, Curley’s wife, all due to his unability to control his strength. The animalistic comparison also forshadows Lennie’s death, as he is shot in the head in the same manner as Candy’s dog, both of them put down for their own good.

    In addition, Lennie is shown as less coordinated than George, and struggling to copy him.This is shown when “The first man stopped short in the clearing, and the follower nearly ran over him” This shows that Lennie is less controlled and animalistic, and is quite clumsy and unaware of his surroundings, always jumping in with both feet and never considering the future.

    Lennie is also compared to a horse, with “drank with long gulps, snorting into the water like a horse”. This shows that Lennie acts much like animals, only acting on instinct, in this instance thirst, with no thought to the quality of the water, which is described as “green” and “scummy”. This animalistic description also serves to create contrast between Lennie and George, with George pausing and testing the water, then telling Lennie off for drinking it.

    Overall, George sees Lennie as a tamed animal, but an animal nonetheless; and no matter how hard Lennie tries to mimic George, he will never be an exact copy.George has no option other than to try and control Lennie as best as he can, this is shown when Lennie slurps the dirty water without hesitation and George scolds him. This creates the idea that Lennie is Georges pet, and George is the owner, and that seems to be the way George views Lennie.

    C) Lennie’s movements are shown to be much less controlled and animalistic than George’s; this is shown when he “drank with long gulps, snorting into the water like a horse”, while George hesitates because it is dirty, and says “Lennie, for God’ sakes don’t drink so much.” This shows that George’s movements are more pre-calculated, unlike Lennie, who doesn’t consider the long-term and only acts on instinct.
    Lennie is also shown to be more clumsy and un-coordinated than George. This is displayed when “The first man stopped short in the clearing, and the follower nearly ran over him”. This shows that George has to lead him, as Lennie is unaware of his surroundings, and gets so distracted that when George stops, he nearly bumps into him. George therefore needs to be in front to guide him, as he is more spacelly aware. Lennie also appears clumsy with “Lennie dabbled his big paw in the water”. This creates the image of a large, hard to control animal.

    Reply
    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      Great answers Savannah for A grade scores, but how long did it take you? How do you condense this into 10 minutes? You have explained yourself fully with keen understanding of characterisation – now you need to use a stopwatch!

      Sent from my iPhone

      Reply

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