Mr Legowski’s 10xEN1 home learning – due Tuesday 12 November

Whose voice do we hear in ‘Lamentations’? Write a developed PEE paragraph in the box below – minimum five sentences and at least two references to the text.

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33 thoughts on “Mr Legowski’s 10xEN1 home learning – due Tuesday 12 November

  1. Joe Mckeown

    from the lamentations i think the voice we hear is a voice of a experienced solider. i would specifically say hes experienced because from the sounds of the words it makes it sound painful full of suffer pain and sadness. For example the words that make it sound so sad are: blind of darkness, crying, lost all patriotic feeling, moaned sobbed,choked, kneeling, bleeding war, his rampant grief. But from the way the voice had said it, it made it sound like a daily thing for him to see. But it also makes it sound like he has realized how bad things are getting because of the last few words it says (Such men have lost all patriotic feeling.) thats all i can think to say thanks for reading Joe mckeown

    Reply
    1. Mr Legowski

      Thanks Joe. I like your comment about such events being a daily event. Please use capital letters and full stops, as well as quotation marks, in every task, whether on the blog or in your book. Mr Legowski

      Reply
  2. Niamh

    In lamentations I think we hear the voice of a soldier. I think he is experienced because the words “it was no good trying” sound as though he has experienced this pain first hand. Plus it says “Such men have lost all patriotic feeling” it sounds as if he has seen this happen to many men fighting in the war. It may even be written from the point of view of the author himself because he has written it in first person for example it says “I found him in the guard room”. Also we know that Sassoon fought in the First World War in person and lost his brother too.

    Reply
    1. Mr Legowski

      ‘“Such men have lost all patriotic feeling” it sounds as if he has seen this happen to many men fighting in the war.’ – Good stuff, Niamh!

      Reply
  3. Lucy

    In Lamentations we hear the voice of an experienced soldier who has negative feelings towards being a man in the army. This is shown through the description of the man who has obviously got some sort of mental problem (due to being in the war). For example, “…he howled and beat his chest.” Also, the use of the adjective “blundered” in the phrase “And blundered in,” gives the impression that he is not just mentally wounded, but physically too.

    Reply
  4. Rosie

    The point of view is from that of a fellow soldier. He understands the emotions that the suffering soldier is feeling, but I don’t think he has experienced them first-hand. He is clearly against the horrors of war, even if it means fighting for your country. This is shown in the line: “Such men have lost all patriotic feeling”, as it is saying that the suffering man doesn’t feel like he’s being brave for his country; he feels like he’s being hurt through the loss of a close one. The phrase “he howled and beat his chest” suggests that the suffering soldier is hurting so much mentally, that he’s trying to hurt himself physically so that the internal pain isn’t so agonising.

    Reply
    1. Mr Legowski

      Thanks Rosie. You’ve made some interesting comments about the grieving man, however what else can we infer about the poet’s voice (the persona – the one who is speaking to us)?

      Reply
  5. olivia

    the lamentations i think we hear is a fellow soldier that has experienced the pain and emotions of the sergeant spoke about in the poem. i believe he is an ex soldier from the description he said the sergeant was doing, ‘moaned, shouted, sobbed, and choked.’ only he can see what pain he is going through, from the loss of his brother. i also think that by him saying ‘i found him… from the blind darkness i had heard his crying and blundered in.’ from this i can take out and say that the ex soldier felt the pain as he entered the base as though he had gone through the same pain and felt sympathy as the sergeant greived.

    Reply
    1. Mr Legowski

      Thanks Olivia. A good first look at this GCSE poem. Is it, though, the sergeant who has ‘has experienced the pain and emotions’? Also, please use capital letters and full stops, as well as quotation marks, in every task, whether on the blog or in your book.

      Reply
  6. Ruby W

    In the poem Lamentations , I think, that the voice we hear is that of a soldier telling of his experience through another man. The person who ‘blundered in’ may have been what he would have seen if he had walked into the room with him crying on the floor. The author of the poem has first hand experience of war and the common metaphors used when referring to those who have died in the war. Such as ‘his brother had gone west’. His view of war is that of grievance and sadness as to those who lost their lives.

    Reply
    1. Mr Legowski

      Thanks Ruby, Yes, it’s a poem about the impact of war on the individual. What else can we infer about the persona, the person whose voice speaks to us?

      Reply
  7. ellie

    The poem lamentations the voice we hear is a fellow solider that could be a friend because it sounds like he has been in the war for a long time and used to seeing people dying but the other solider might be new and isn’t used to seeing people die. Also the solider might be sad because “his brother had gone west” which might mean he has died. “blundered in” shows that the solider stumbled in and is so physically wounded that he is howling and beating his chest. It also shows the solider talking about the effects of war.

    Reply
    1. Mr Legowski

      Thanks Ellie. A good effort, though do check your comments for accuracy – the soldier ISN’T ‘so physically wounded that he is howling and beating his chest’.

      Reply
  8. Tara Bashford

    In the poem Lamentations, I think the voice we hear is of an experienced solider who has seen other soldiers killed and injured day after day. The writer of the poem was an officer and his brother was a victim in the war, so this suggests that the poet is writing from his point of view. But I may be wrong. Only the solider can describe such words about the war “…moaned, shouted, sobbed, and choked…”

    Reply
  9. Erin

    In the poem, I think that the voice you hear is from someone who is witnessing what is happening. I believe this because it is written in the third person. “His rampant grief.” It could be the voice of a higher rank soldier because he knows about all the death he has seen from past memories. “Raved at the bleeding war.”

    Reply
    1. dartmouthacademyeng Post author

      Thank you, Erin. Do the separate sentences of your answer necessarily follow from each other? For example, does the third-person narrative prove it is ‘someone who is witnessing what is happening’? Is it the voice of an office because he ‘raved at the bleeding war’?

      Reply
  10. Sophie

    I my opinion, Laminations, the poem, is of the voice of a current soldier. This is because language such as, “guard room” is used. In the class discussion we couldn’t recognise what a guard room actually is and where it is. Therefore, it must be a soldier, as they would obviously know. The poem is very deep, and rather emotional, “Moaned, shouted, sobbed and choked.” So again a soldier would understand the feeling of loss and pain, as they could have gone through it (with friends, fellow soldiers or even family). Also, “raved at the bleeding war” shows that he knows how much pain he is feeling and most probably despises the war himself.

    Reply
  11. Emilia

    In the Lamentations poem I think we hear the voice of an experienced solider/sergeant who has witnessed the after effects from fighting in the war. The writer of the poem appears to be a sergeant/solider because the words he describes ‘moaned, shouted, sobbed and choked.’ seem to be the description that an experienced sergeant/solider would use. The perspective of this poem is not that war is outrageous but that how war effects people after and how they go ‘west’, crazy.

    Reply
  12. Ian

    Within the poem Lamentations, it has been clearly shown that the point of view we read is from another soldier. We can learn this by the expression, “From the blind darkness I had heard his crying And blundered in.” This suggests that the area was near war as the word “blundered” is a word associated with fatigue or an injury. There is also another sentence, “it was no good trying To stop it.” In this phrase, it shows that he had already written this as when read, it seems he jumps to that conclusion. Furthermore, “In my belief Such men have lost all patriotic feeling.” This bold statement can also indicate that the perspective is another soldier. Sassoon seems to write in a way where there is no thought process [needed], concluding that he had seen these things before, only horrifically in war.

    Reply
  13. Georgia

    In the poem ‘Lamentations’ I think the voice is that of a military personnel. Possibly at a higher rank than the sergeant as he is allowed to ‘blunder’ into the guard-room, unaccompanied and unquestioned. The sergeant who is already in the room, carries on looking at the man confused as he is baffled by his behaviour. The voice has no empathy with the man/soldier, we know this because he has stereotyped him and he says, “In my belief such men have lost all patriotic feeling” This shows that he feels the man/soldier is no longer behaving as a soldier should, and putting his country before everything else.

    Reply
  14. Jaz

    In the poem I think the voice we hear is the poets himself I think he is trying to portray the solider as himself but almost in the way he is telling it, is like he is looking on himself, and the man who is telling it is a sergeant higher up in the rank giving him permission to just walk into where he wants “I blundered in” and he sounds concerned.

    Reply
  15. Elliot Tremlett-Jones

    In the poem we here the voice of a soldier. He is talking about finding a man kneeling half naked on the floor because his brother had gone south. I think this means that his brother had died and he had seen it causing some sort of post traumatic stress. The writer also refers to the person losing his patriotic feeling sort of like losing moral. Meaning he has practically giving up on life

    Reply
  16. Samantha

    When reading this poem i imagine a elder experienced writer who may not no first hand but has seen the destruction of war. Some one who understands how your life can be effected even after war. This shown in the poem for example ” his rampant grief moaned, shouted,sobbed, and chocked”. This makes me think that the outsider feels useless and saddened by the situation, the use of the word ‘grief’ imply’s this. ” from the blind darkness”, this makes me think he has been blinded by orders and violence to the extent of not even being able to see or remember why he is fighting, and involved in the war in the first place. You can almost hear the emotion when reading it that is what make this poem original.

    Reply
  17. jelley

    In lamentations the voice we hear is a old man to be told of his brother has died coming from the front-line. We find him at the guard room in the base HQ. This could be his brother on the floor dying and howling. Also his brother had gone west, this could show that as the sun goes down his brother goes with it to the grail!

    Reply
  18. Nell Perrott-Pitcher

    In the poem Lamentations the voice we hear is the voice of a soldier speaking about his experience. The officer who ‘blundered in’ to see the man on the floor may have been what sassoon had seen when he was in the war. The author uses his experiance of war to put a great deal of feeling into the poem. the metaphor ‘his brother had gone west’ is a euphamism, making the suffereing of the men dying seem much lighter.

    Reply
  19. james callard

    in my opinion the voice we hear in lamintataions is the solder who’s is watching another solder learning about the news that his brother had died in the last couple weeks of the great war. for example, ‘i heard his crying and blundered in’ or mabye ‘ in my belief such men have lost all patriotic feeling.’ when the text says ‘ i heard his crying and blundered in’ it is clearly sugesting that the man walked in and watched the whole event before his eyes, not only this but the other reason it must be a man/ solder is because he devolops an opinion e.g ‘ in my belief such men have lost all patriotic feeling’

    Reply

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